At The Shows


Scene: New York Fashion Week. The energy was high, the looks were wide ranging, and everyone involved, in many ways, was striking and beautiful in their own way. It’s about street style with a show ready attitude, all put together for a fabulous show of style off the runways. Monochromatic looks, matching sets, subdued and brilliant hues, patterns, bucket hats, and chunky sneakers kicking for comfort. While most are focused on the models coming down the runway, some of the coolest looks of the season can be found on the street. Above photo, LZ Granderson and Franco Velastiqui, Models, Click Model Management.


Scene: Kim Fath and Sophie Koehrmann.


Scene: Emilie Ma wearing a pink feather skirt.


Scene: NiuNiu Chou of Mrhua Mrshua, Fashion Designer, and friend after his runway show at Pier59 Studios. He is an artistic designer focused on promoting Chinese fashion’s cultural heritage and ethnic origins. NiuNiu Chou uses Pop Art as an approach to cross borders with fashion.


Scene: Alexis Gonzalez, Style Guru Intern for College Fashionista, and DwSnapShot, Photographer.


Scene: Mila Sutton, Petite Model with Numa Models, wearing a vintage Anthony Vaccarello seamless meshed dress, found through her collaboration with Designer Revival on the UES, NYC. Underneath is an Intimissimi bodysuit. Raincoat from Topshop and purse is a classic Valentino Studded bag, paired with a Rebecca mink off leather purse accessory.


Scene: Jhon Pierre Cornell wearing Deron Shields t-shirt design with safety pins.


Scene: Genevieve, Beauty and Fashion Blogger.


Scene: Guests waiting for the doors to open.


Scene: Gabe Pepper, Fashion Designer, creates effortless and modern work-to-weekend garments for woman.


Scene: Guests wearing soft hued dresses.


Scene: Masha Agapkina, Artist and Fashion Designer, Founder of Monosuit.


Scene:  Lisa Caluag and Angelie Fulton, Design Director for Of The Saint, with her son Robert Edison Fulton V.


Scene: Luisa Verfuerth and Steffen Diers.


Scene: Black and White.


Scene: Douglas Henry, Fashion Writer.


Scene: Aaron Williams, Photographer.


Scene: Standing in line for the show.


Scene: Guests checking in.


Scene: The audience before the Supima show.


Scene: Alli wearing Subin Hahn, Gender Fluid Wear. Taken from traditionally feminine elements, his designs challenge traditional mens and unisex fashion aesthetics, aiming to provide equality in the current fashion industry, while embracing his or her own ambiguity and fluidity.*


Scene: Evan Sebastian Lagache wearing Subin Hahn, Gender Fluid Wear. A video of his collection.*


Scene: Model wearing Julianna Bass, Fashion Designer, at Skylight Clarkson Square. Shades of silver, gold, and rose gold-foiled lambskin stuck out in a sea of lilacs, ivory and rich orchid color schemes. A beautiful collection of wearable pieces.*


Scene: Model wearing Julianna Bass, Fashion Designer, flocked tulle blouse with ruffle collar.*


Scene: Model wearing Jelly Shan, MFA Fashion Design. The School of Fashion at Academy of Art University premiered Spring collections of several BFA and MFA graduates at New York Fashion Week.* 


Scene: Model wearing Eden Slezin, MFA Fashion Design. Academy of Art University was established in 1929. It is the largest private university of art and design in the United States.* 


Scene: Dami, “influential by happenstance”.


Scene: Ashley Weddington, Fashion Blogger, capturing the essence of her effortless style.


Scene: Kristina Shakht, Fashion and Portrait Photographer, from Saint Petersburg, Russia.


Scene: Stephanie Demetrios, Freelance Writer and Content Creator.


Scene: Guest wearing matte and shiny copper bronze.


Scene: Guest at work between shows.


Scene: Guest styled up.


Scene: Von Lee, Photographer and Filmmaker.


Scene: Elizabeth Downey, Ombeline le Mire-Cahn, and Lexi McKimmey. Models before the show.


Scene: Bevan G. Meyers, Studio Director at Pier59 Studios.


Scene: Guest dashing in.


Scene: Andresha De Bourg with a smile, color, and flowers.


Scene: Lucia Martinez Nash and Nati Saal from Buenos Aires, Argentina.


Scene: New York Fashion Week.
*Runway photos from previous seasons, but fitting for this story.

 

 

 

My Woodstock Story


Scene: My Woodstock Program Magazine from 1969.

I loved going downtown to this magazine and newspaper store by the train station when I was young to look at the publications and to buy the Village Voice.


I was reading the Village Voice in the summer of 1969 and read about the Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music, taking place in August.


My friends, Billy DeMichele and Larry Robinson, knew about it too. We decided to go with our parents permission. We were some of the youngest pilgrims.


So, on Thursday, August 14, we met at Larry’s house. Mrs. Robinson drove us as far as she could in her red Volkswagen Beetle. The influx of attendees to the rural concert created a massive traffic jam. We then got out of the car and were walking along the road with the masses coming from every direction.


Arriving at Bethel we continued to walk to Max Yasgur’s 600 acre dairy farm surrounded by the Catskill Mountains. The diverse attendees descended to the legendary event which later was known simply as Woodstock.


It was a pivotal moment in popular music history, defined a generation, and became synonymous with the counterculture movement of the 1960s. The zeitgeist of my generation.


My vision of the event was like a high school football game, spectators on the bleachers and musical entertainers in the middle of the field. I never expected such a huge gathering. We planned to buy our $24.00 tickets for three days when we got there.


But, by the time we got to Woodstock people started arriving a couple days ahead of the concert. The fencing, gates and ticket booths still weren’t ready.


Billy asked this guy how far it was and he said “You see that brown area over there” Yes, that big hill, Billy said “That’s not a hill man, that’s people” he said. We walked and stopped at the top of the slope and saw with amazement a half a million strong, and everywhere there was song and celebration.


It was the brainchild of four men under 27, according to Michael Lang, one of the four, in an interview with The Telegraph, “You do everything you can to get the gates and the fences finished—but you have your priorities. People are coming, and you need to be able to feed them, and take care of them, and give them a show. So you have to prioritize.” With no efficient way of charging concert-goers, Lang and his partners decided to make Woodstock a free event.


We set up the pup tent to the left of the stage about half way up the slope. My mother gave us enough chicken cutlet sandwiches that I shared them with the surrounding spectators. They loved it, and yes my mom was a great cook! She was born in the States and her parents emigrated from Italy. And you know about those Italian mothers — eat, eat, mangiare, mangiare. And we still had enough in the cooler for the coming days.


The festival was off to a shaky start on Friday, August 15 — several hours after the scheduled kickoff time, not a note of music had been played. Richie Havens was moved up to the opening performance slot after Sweetwater were stopped by police en route to the festival and other artists were delayed on the thruway. Organizers convinced Richie Havens to go on stage alone with his guitar. At around 5:00pm he took the stage and played. Each time he tried to finish his set, he found himself being talked into going back out. But after two hours and 45 minutes of playing, Havens ran out of material. So, he improvised. Over the intensely rhythmic strum of his own acoustic, Havens composed a festival-inspired song called “Freedom” on the spot.


Havens was followed by an unscheduled blessing by Sri Swami Satchidananda.


To follow was Sweetwater, Bert Sommer, Tim Harden, Ravi Shankar, and Melanie who performed during the rain. As the rain continued, starting off Saturday was Arlo Guthrie at around 12 midnight, and Joan Baez, who was six months pregnant, and sang until 2am.


Earlier we met some girls, a platonic relationship. After the performances and after the rain we all went to the hillside away from the crowd. We laid in the grass looking up at the stars and talked about the universe.


On Saturday morning I went to find a phone behind the stage to call my parents before the performances started and I finally found one.


In a box by the phone booth I found several program magazines. The photos in this post are from it. I called my parents and they immediately said — get home now! But, I stayed until the very end. And I didn’t get in trouble when I returned home. No one expected the magnitude of this gathering, including my parents.


We went to the top of the slope to the food area where they were giving food out for free. There were only oranges left so we took some. There were rows and rows of motorcycles and the Hells Angels. An example of peaceful coexistence which the festival promoted and it was demonstrated by all of the attendees. Dr. William Abruzzi, the festival’s chief medical officer said “There was no violence what so ever which is remarkable for a crowd this large. These people are really beautiful.”


Sunday around 12:30am Creedence Clearwater Revival played, who were the first to sign up for this concert. Janis Joplin, Sly and the Family Stone, and The Who played through the night until 6am. Jefferson Airplane performed next from 8am – 10am. It was difficult to stay up through the night and morning, but I did. I slept until 2pm when I heard the voice of Joe Cocker and The Grease Band. After his last song “With A Little Help From My Friends” the thunderstorm disrupted the event for several hours.


While it rained we stayed in our tent and smoked some pot, ate chicken cutlet sandwiches, and played cards. I also went to the stream while it rained, water, very free and easy. We didn’t go sliding in the mud like others did.


At 6:30pm it picked up again with Country Joe and the Fish. Through the evening and the night the musicians were Ten Years After, The Band, Johnny Winters, Blood, Sweat and Tears, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, Paul Butterfield Band, and Sha Na Na which ended on Monday morning at 8am.


At 9am Jimmy Hendricks and his new band Gypsy Sun and Rainbows, was the last act to perform. The two-hour set included his psychedelic rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner” after which he segued into “Purple Haze”. Hendrix was wearing a blue-beaded white leather jacket with fringe and a red head scarf.


Under the sun, under the stars, and in the rain we listened to 32 amazing musical sets during our stay.


Happy that my parents gave me the freedom to go and get my soul free and to get back to the garden. It was a joyful and historic experience that I will always cherish and talk about.


We were attracted by the music, but we found more — love, peace, and unity. It reminds us during these times of the nearness that love, music, and shared experiences can elicit. We are stardust, we are golden. I found the garden.


And then we hitchhiked home.

Please note: Most of the the phrases in italics are lyrics from “Woodstock” by Joni Mitchell. Exceptions are the song title “My Generation” by The Who, and “Freedom” by Richie Havens, “water, very free and easy”, lyrics from “Wooden Ships” by Cosby, Still, and Nash which all were performed at this epic event. Mitchell composed the song based on what she had heard from her then boyfriend Graham Nash about the event. She had not been there herself, since a manager had told her that it would, instead, be more advantageous for her to appear on The Dick Caveat Show. She composed it in a hotel room in New York City, watching televised reports of the festival.

 

 

 

Happy Birthday America


Scene: Maria, a proud and colorful American, sparkling her way up the street in red, white, and blue to celebrate Independence Day.
Independence Day by S. Ginsberg:
My country / Noble / Resilient / Troubled / Divided / Strong / Still a beacon of hope / In this uncertain world / Ever striving toward the “Dream” / Not of the white picket fence, / but of Equality / Generosity / Liberty / Compassion and / Justice / For All / “We hold these truths to be self-evident” / Happy Birthday, America!

 

 

 

Harry and Nancy’s Club Room


Scene: Harry King and Nancy Donahue at their famed fashion reunion soiree. The recent bash was in the Club Room, at the Soho Grand Hotel. It was a get-together full of joy, celebration, and conversation. The glamorous and fun guests included models, models, and supermodels, photographers, editors, fashion designers, art directors, hair and makeup stylists, producers, and other industry greats and notables. Talented, wonderful, and fun people. The mood was festive. Another stellar night with Nancy and Harry at their shindig!


Scene: Superfriends and Supermodels Alva Chinn and Nancy Donahue.
Co-Host Nancy Donahue is an American Fashion Model, Mother, Entrepreneur, and Yoga Instructor. She first took the modeling world by storm in the late 70s after being discovered by Mademoiselle magazine. Over the next two decades, she rose to the top of her field, becoming one of the most successful fashion models of her time. She graced the covers and pages of countless American and European magazines. Nancy worked alongside some of the top international models including Carol Alt, Gia Caranza, Janice Dickinson, Kelly Emberg, Kim Alexis, and Esmé Marshal. I worked with all of them when I was Fashion Art Director at Bloomingdale’s. Nancy walked the runway for Calvin Klien, Ralph Lauren, Donna Karen, and Perry Ellis. She worked with numerous renowned photographers including Irving Penn, Author Elgort, Denis Piel, and Patrick Demarchelier. She still models, represented by Iconic Focus. She and her current business partners developed the BelleCore bodybuffer exclusively at Neiman Marcus and Harrods of London, now sold at high end spas across the country. She is passionate about health and fitness and is a certified Personal Trainer, Pilates and Yoga Instructor. And a superwoman!


Scene: Harry King with his niece, Rochelle Mello, Head of Global Investigations, Senior Anti-corruption Counsel at Avon.
Co-Host Harry King is a Freelance Hairdresser, Photographer, Party Thrower, and Hairstyling Legend. Originally from London, when he first arrived in New York in 1973 he worked at Cinandre on 57th Street. Five months later Polly Mellon, Editor, snapped him up for Vogue. His hair styles have been featured on the covers and editorial pages of many magazines including Cosmopolitan, Bazaar, Interview, American, British, and Italian Vogue, Grazia, and Stern. Harry has collaborated with renowned photographers including Richard Avedon, Arthur Elgort, Francesco Scavullo, and Irving Penn. His celebrity list includes Sophia Loren, Raquel Welch, Diana Ross, and Madonna. Models he has creatively reinvented hair styles for fashion and beauty shoots include Patty Hanson, Iman, Cheryl Tiegs, Stephanie Seymour, Twiggy, Beverly Johnson, and of course Nancy Donahue. He has taken memorable photos on many of his shoots through out his career. Truly fashion history behind the scenes. And a superguy!


Scene: Alva Chinn, Halstonette, is currently an Actress, Yoga Instructor, and Models occasionally; and Rashgene Gazi-White, Co-Founder and Vice President at Re.new Artists, Imaging and Consulting.
Alva, in February was one of the models in the grand finale of designer Naeem Khan’s Fall 2019 runway show featuring three models, all over age 60, walking the runway in silver sequined gowns: Alva Chinn, Karen Bjornson, and Pat Cleveland known for working with Halston in the 70’s, Halstonettes. Khan was an apprentice under Halston earlier in his career.


Scene: Rodrigo Adeo, Interior Design; Julie Britt, Fashion Stylist and former Harper’s Bazzar Editor;  Tim Easton, Model represented by Heroes Model Management; and Sumner Hatch, Artist, Photographer, and Darkroom Printer.


Scene: Ray Crespin, former Harper’s Bazzar and Vogue Editor, with Joey Hunter and Kim Charlton.


Scene: Nancy Donahue, Model, Mother, Entrepreneur, and Yoga Instructor; and Jonathan Benjamin Parker, Owner of Mannequin, ready-to-wear and couture, who designed Nancy’s dress. “Creamsicle” is a four ply silk crepe couture garment which took two and a half months to create.
Jonathan has been a designer for over 20 years, starting in 1997. “I’m not a pop up designer, I’m the real thing” he said. He does everything himself. Everything. The pattern, cutting, and sewing. The production is in New York. His business partner, Sherry, is his best friend and focuses on the marketing and digital side of the business. They are finishing the Online Boutique of his ready-to-wear collection which will launch soon.


Scene: Helen S. Murray; and Ray Crespin, former Harper’s Bazzar and Vogue Editor.
Helen and I first met at a shooting in Central Park, photographed by Eric Bowman, for Calvin Klein, where she was Director of Publicity and I was Fashion Art Director at Bloomingdale’s.  She said “It was one of the best jobs I had during my career. Calvin was working with the best of the best in the industry and it was an incredible time which will never, ever be replicated.”


Scene: Barbara Tate, Interior Designer; and Moiz Alladina, Hair Stylist.


Scene: Bill Westmoreland, Photographer, Filmmaker, and Hair/Makeup Artist; and Harry King, Freelance Hairdresser, Photographer, Party Thrower, and Hairstyling Legend.


Scene: Joy Bell, former Wilhelmina Model, currently a Freelance Photographer focusing on fashion models, travel, and music; and Freddie Leiba, renowned Fashion Editor and Stylist.


Scene: Nancy Donahue; Jeffrey Felner; and Harry King.


Scene: Lauren Bridgeman; Joe Boggess, Hair/Makeup Artist and Photographer; Jany Tomba, former Ford Model, after 30 years of modeling she became a Cultural Icon in the Haitian community. She has received many awards, attended, and supported charity functions to attract a Haitian crowd. Jany used to paint and sculpt, but lately has turned that passion for colors into textile art and spends a lot of time creating knits since she comes from a prominent artistic family. Jany’s father was a pioneer painter in the Haitian art scene. She spends time with her family and the grandchildren. Here’s a documentary video produced and directed by her niece, Sasha Huber. “Life moves on” Jany said.


Scene: Yasmine Guenancia, former Elite Model, currently a Mother, Grandmother, and a Real Estate Broker at Douglas Elliman; Dustin Pittman, Photographer, and Insider of the Andy Warhol Factory; Kim Charlton, former Ford Model, currently a Mother, models on occasion with Ford Models as a Classic Model, sells real estate and does charity work.


Scene: Nancy Donahue, Model, Mother, Entrepreneur, and Yoga Teacher; and Julie Anderson, former Elite London Model, currently with Iconic Models, a Mother, and Creator and Publisher of the Feminine Collective, an online magazine; with James Bosco, Fashion Editor Vogue Patterns.


Scene: Bob Menna, former Elite Model, currently working on a Museum Project with Joey Hunter; Jeffrey Banks, Coty Award winning Fashion Designer and Author; and Thom Fleming, former Ford Model, currently a Firefighter/EMT.


Scene: Kissy Mentovay, Chef and part time Artist, who loves to paint; and Max Herrera, Sous Chef, currently studying Business in college.


Scene: Ricardo Marin, worked at Cinandre, currently a Hair/Makeup Artist; Carmen D’Alessio, former Public Relations for Studio 54, currently holds court at her sunset party on the rooftop of the PhD Downtown; and Joshua Kokeny, Loro Piana Store Manager.


Scene: Kim Charlton; Shanti Patty Owen; Linda Mason, Internationally recognized Makeup Artist, Cosmetics Entrepreneur, Visual Artist, and Filmmaker, whose work is characterized by her vivid and creative use of color; and Yasmine Guenancia.


Scene: Kim Charlton; Dustin Pittman; Shanti Patty Owen; and Yasmine Guenancia.


Scene: Kim Charlton; Dustin Pittman; Shanti Patty Owen; Yasmine Guenancia; and Steven Maginnis, Reporter and Blogger.


Scene: Linda Morand Phillips with her family and friends. Maria Amanau; Linda, her daughters Kitty Phillips and Mirjana Morand; Nya Trycha; and her son John Phillips.


Scene: Tony Spinelli, former Zoli and Ford Model, represented by Iconic Models Focus, a Father, and Owner Spinelli Bros. Bakery Co; Barbara Tate, Interior Designer; and Alan Gold, Hairstylist and Colorist.


Scene: Richard Warren, Photographer; and Shanti Patty Owen, former Elite Model and Actress, currently an Author and Relationship Coach.


Scene: Alva Chinn a Halstonette, is currently an Actress, Yoga Instructor, and Models occasionally; and Jennifer Brice, former Elite and Ford Model, currently an Actress.
Alva and Jennifer went to Paris in November of 1973 where French and American luminaries of fashion came together for the majestic Palais de Versailles Fashion Show. Created by Eleanor Lambert and Versailles curator Gerald Van der Kemp, the show brought together French designers Yves St. Laurent, Christian Dior, Hubert de Givenchy, Emanuel Ungaro, and Pierre Cardin, and American designers Oscar de la Renta, Stephen Burrows, Halston, Bill Blass, and Anne Klein, who brought Donna Karen. The American designers featured eleven African American models, an unprecedented number at the time. Alva, Jennifer, Pat Cleveland, Bethann Hardison, and several others were these legendary models who helped open the doors for women of color in the modeling industry.


Scene: Justice Soloman, Jennifer Brice’s son; and Corey Dorson, former Elite and Zoli Model who has worked for luxury brands such as Prada, Yves Saint Laurent, and David Yurman in managerial positions.


Scene: Jeffrey Felner, Fashion Insider, Contributor for several online sites including Examiner.com, and a Book Reviewer; and Rick Gillette, in the 70s/80s he was behind the scenes on some of the most memorable magazine editorial stories as a leading Hair/Makeup Artist, currently a Principle at FRG Interior Design.


Scene: Alexia Planas Lee; Stan Wan, Photographer; and Amanda Ibrahim.


Scene: Barry Weinbaum, Creative Consultant; and Joe Boggess, Hair/Makeup Artist and Photographer.


Scene: Campbell Jack, Model, represented by Debut Model Agency, who will be appearing in Mannaquin’s next collection presentation; and Nancy Donahue, both wearing outfits designed by Jonathan Benjamin Parker, Owner of Mannequin. Nancy is wearing the “Creamsicle” couture dress and Campbell is wearing a blouse and cigarette pant from his ready-to-wear line. The basis of his ready-to-wear collection is “Make your own look with Mannequin’s tailored separates.”


Scene: Dante and Ari, Tony Spinelli’s children; and Nicky Pantano, Joey Hunter and Kim Charlton’s son.


Scene: Dakota Green, 💇‍♀️Hairstylist 👗Fashion Designer ✂️; and Sylvie Hoke, Photographer.


Scene: Duane Gazi-White, Director of Scouting at New York Model Management; Pat Tracey, Model and Model Career Consulate; and Rashgene Gazi-White, Co-Founder and Vice President at Re.new Artists, Imaging and Consulting.


Scene: Linda Morand Phillips, in the 60s/70s was on the scene with Twiggy. Linda was compared to Jackie Kennedy for her resemblance, and was one of the first American models to walk the runway for French haute couture shows; Dustin Pittman, Photographer; and Linda Mason, Makeup Artist, Cosmetics Entrepreneur, Visual Artist, and Filmmaker.


Scene: Kim Charlton; Bhavaja Kat; Stan Wan; Yasmine Guenancia; Joey Hunter; and Tony Spinelli.


Scene: Marc Benecke, former Studio 54 Doorman; and Myra Scheer, former Executive Assistant to Studio 54 Co-Owner Steve Rubell. They currently host SiriusXM Studio 54 Radio, The Marc and Myra Show, with insiders from the iconic era.


Scene: DJ of the night, Delphine Blue, spins the tunes while Nancy Donahue and Harry King happily party.


Scene: Chinedy Chukuigwe; Tessa Souter, Jazz Singer and Song Writer; Sue Lampard; and Diara Bamba.


Scene: Daniel Cohen, worked at Vidal Sassoon Madison Avenue, currently a Real Estate Broker at Douglas Elliman; Patrice Casanova, Photographer; and Guest.


Scene: Corey Dorson, former Elite and Zoli Model who has worked for luxury brands such as Prada, Yves Saint Laurent, and David Yurman in managerial positions; and Linda Morand Phillips, Fashion Model, Cover Girl, and Haute Couture Mannequin during the 60s/70s. Linda started out with Lauren Hutton and later with Grace Jones. And was on set with Jean Shrimpton, an English Model and Actress who was an icon of Swinging London, and Catherine Deneuve. She was discovered by Eileen Ford. Currently a Fashion Archivist and Consultant.


Scene: Loraine Abeles, Hair/Makeup Artist; and Benjamin Pasteur, Actor, known for Front Cover,  Chronicles Of, and Opening Night.


Scene: Carmen D’Alessio, former Public Relations for Studio 54, is a public relations star in the nightclub industry who has promoted many nightclubs in the city, from Limelight, Tunnel, Cain, and Plumm. She currently holds court at her sunset party on the rooftop of the PhD Downtown.


Scene: Tricia Gudbrandsen, Connecticut based Events Photographer and Freelance Production; Jennifer Backus, former Ford and Wilhemina Model, currently a Mother and Landscape Photographer; and Daniel Cohen, worked at Vidal Sassoon Madison Avenue, currently a Real Estate Broker at Douglas Elliman.


Scene: Sebastiano Cappitta, Restauranteur; Asia Janina Dyrkacz, former Elite Model, Founder of Models Against Addictions non-profit; Bhavaja Kat, former Ford and Elite Model who still models for special bookings. She started working with Ford when she was in high school. Kat worked as a model all over Northern Europe and Asia, worked for an Italian TV station, and owned a restaurant, resorts, and a bed and breakfast in Rapallo and Lampedusa, Italy. Currently she has a private practice as a Psychotherapist specializing in trauma and abuse, working throughout New Jersey with the Board of Education in diverse school districts as a Behavioral Disabilities Program Coordinator, Case Manager, and Therapist.; and Rene Rimmer, Corporate Financial Admin.


Scene: AS IF Magazine crew Tom Suvajic; Tatiana Shoah, Editor in Chief, Co-Creative Director, and Co-Founder; and Kristopher Fraser, Fashion Editor.


Scene: Scene: Ricardo Marin, worked at Cinandre, currently a Hair/Makeup Artist; Alva Chinn, Halstonette, is currently an Actress, Yoga Instructor, and Models occasionally; and Joshua Kokeny, Loro Piana Store Manager.


Scene: Tricia Gudbrandsen, Connecticut based Events Photographer and Freelance Production; Jennifer Backus, former Ford and Wilhemina Model, currently a Mother and Landscape Photographer.


Scene: L.J. Kirby, worked at Studio 54, currently in Financial Services at Randstad; Myra Scheer, former Executive Assistant to Studio 54 Co-Owner Steve Rubell, currently Co-Host, SiriusXM Studio 54 Radio, The Marc and Myra Show; and Richie Williamson. Aerographics, Richie and Dean Janoff’s partnership, was hired to create the dance floor sets for Studio 54 including the famous Moon and Spoon, currently a Photographer.


Scene: Here I am with Nancy Donahue. We both danced at Studio 54 at different times. We worked together several times, and many of them for Perry Ellis ads when I was Fashion Art Director at Bloomingdale’s. Photo by James Bosco, with my camera.


Scene: Loraine Abeles, Hair/Makeup Artist; and Bill Jarema, worked at Studio 54, currently Owner, Cricket Hill Auction and Realty.


Scene: Bill Westmoreland, Photographer, Filmmaker, and Hair/Makeup Artist; and David Spagnolo, Photographer.


Scene: Pam Geiger, Hair/Make Artist. We had a great trip to the Bahamas with William Garret, Photographer, and David Turner, Assistant, when I was Executive Art Director at Revlon; Bhavaja Kat, former Ford and Elite Model who still models for special bookings. Currently she has a private practice as a Psychotherapist specializing in trauma and abuse; Beverly Lee, former Ford Model and Ellen Harth Runway model. She gained notoriety as an Asian model after Nixon’s visit to mainland China. Advertisers and fashion designers suddenly wanted Asian models in their ads, and she modeled throughout the U.S. and Europe appearing in major fashion magazines. She was the first person to appear on the cover of Travel and Leisure. Beverly was photographed by Richard Avedon, Horst P. Horst, Francesco Scavullo, and Victor Skrebneski. She walked the runway for many top fashion designers including Cristobal Balenciaga, Geoffrey Beene, Hubert de Givenchy, Karl Lagerfeld, Issey Miyaki, Zandra Rhodes, and Kansai Yamamoto, to name a few. Her film credits include movies by Oliver Stone, Roman Polanski, and Ivan Reitman. She met her husband 38 years ago at a Ford party for Joey Hunter. She graduated from NYU in 2015 with a BA in Creative Writing. Currently she spends her time between NYC and the Hamptons and enjoys a low profile. Her father just turned 105 on Father’s Day and still drives and travels!


Scene: Joey Hunter is Vice President of Modelwire, a software company that provides services to the modeling and talent industry, and a Father. He is working on a museum project with Bob Menna. Joey was President of Ford Model Agency where he started his career as a model. He managed the careers of models such as Christy Turlington, Vendela, and Elle MacPherson; and Tony Spinelli, former Zoli and Ford Model, represented by Iconic Models Focus, a Father, and Owner Spinelli Bros. Bakery Co.


Scene: Nancy Donahue, Model, Mother, Entrepreneur, and Yoga Teacher; and James Bosco, Fashion Editor Vogue Patterns.


Scene: Michael Capo, Fine Art Appraiser and Consultant; and Bob Menna, currently working on a Museum Project with Joey Hunter.


Scene: Scott Fishkind, President and Publisher of AS IF Magazine, a luxury publication; and Pat Tracey, Model and Model Career Consulate.


Scene: Marinne Houtenbos, Arthur Elgort’s longtime Agent and Friend; and Christiaan Houtenbos, Legendary Hairmaster. They were two of the first talents I worked with when I was Fashion Art Director at Bloomingdale’s.


Scene: Frederick Kaufman, Professor of Journalism, Author and Contributing Editor at various publications; Patty Laxton, Real Estate Broker; and Lucy Kaylin, Author and Editor in Chief at O, The Oprah Magazine.


Scene: Seth Adanmenoukon, Model and Music Producer; Kim Charlton, Ja’Dee Murphy, Ceo/Founder of JDM Photography & Model Management; Asia Janina Dyrkaczs; Harry King; Nancy Donahue; and Dustin Pittman. Photo by James Bosco with my camera.


Scene: David Spagnolo, Photographer; Margret Avery, Makeup Artist, Singer, Songwriter, Writer, and Poet; and Bill Westmoreland, Photographer, Filmmaker, and Hair/Makeup Artist.


Scene: Harry King; Nancy Donahue; and Jonathan Benjamin Parker.
Thank you Harry and Nancy for another fab party!

 

 

 

Fashion House SUVPA


Scene: Syracuse University’s College of Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) Senior Fashion Show at Lubin House, the University’s New York City home. The Fashion Design Program of the School of Design presented the designs of 19 graduating seniors. These students explored different avenues for their collections, inspired by nature, different countries, cultures, certain eras, artists, art periods, and sustainability.

The recent event featured senior collections under the leadership of Todd Conover, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator Fashion Design, and Jeffrey Mayer, Professor, Fashion Design and Stylist for this event. Model above is showcasing a garment from the collection of Senior Fashion Designer Nicola Carlacci.


Scene: From Nicola Carlacci’s collection. “Read My Lips is for the romantic and brave. My collection is fantastical, fun, and in your face. This group is for the life of the party girl; a girl who walks into a room and is instantly noticed. I was inspired by the pressure put on women to define the word  “femininety”… For me, femininity is about being empowered…” 


Scene: From the collection of Nicola Carlacci.


Scene: From the collection of Nicola Carlacci.


Scene: From Alexandra Kravitz’s collection. “Déesse Naturelle is for a woman who is confident, sophisticated, and adaptable. The simple silhouettes allow for the surface painting and beading to highlight both the antique Art Nouveau inspiration as well as the woman herself. The fluidity of this collection supports the natural silhouettes of the body…


Scene: From the collection of Alexandra Kravitz.


Scene: From the collection of Alexandra Kravitz


Scene: From Amaya Hunt’s collection. “Blooming with confidence, she is a woman who owns her sexuality. Showcasing her body through clothing, she rebukes societal norms and makes her own rules. Her body is her temple and her clothing is her adornment… Taking inspiration from the Lotus flower, which blooms from murky waters despite it’s surroundings…


Scene: From the collection of Amaya Hunt.


Scene: From the collection of Amaya Hunt.


Scene: From Alana Stanski’s collection. “Kaleidoscope Combustion is a collaboration of the 1960’s and rock era which combines eclectic fabrics that convey a unique blend of both genres. Denim  leather, floral, silk, and suede creatively blended together bring this era to life.


Scene: From the collection of Alana Stanski.


Scene: From the collection of Alana Stanski.


Scene: From Michelle Stark’s collection. “Going With It reflects my belief that the universe has a plan for all of us. This main concept explores the way that even though life sometimes seems chaotic, it all works out in a beautiful way. I am representing my chaotic concept through the riot of texture, fabrics and loose silhouettes throughout the collection…


Scene: From the collection of Michelle Stark.


Scene: From the collection of Michelle Stark.


Scene: From Annie Carson’s collection. “High Noon Ski is an upscale collection of tailored garments reminiscent of the picturesque, wistful and energetic lifestyle of the French Alps. The embellished designs are achieved through bold color, adapted imagery, beading, and mola and trapunto quilting techniques. The shapes, volume, and texture keep the woman warm and sleek après-ski…


Scene: From the collection of Annie Carson.


Scene: From the collection of Annie Carson.


Scene: From Sierra Benedetto Brouillet’s collection. “Blurred is a Fall/Winter collection inspired by the desire to blur the lines of social standards in relation to fashion and gender-relative clothing. This modernized streetwear collection features neutral shapes, contrasting textural elements, and a monochromatic palette to appeal to the modern minded…


Scene: From the collection of Sierra Benedetto Brouillet.


Scene: From the collection of Sierra Benedetto Brouillet.


Scene: From Kerry Phelan’s collection. “Scout showcases the strength and beauty of women pulling inspiration from nature’s powerful and impressive desert landscape. Color, shape, and texture are drawn from the rock formations in the American southwest… The symbolism for the collection is pulled from wildlife, specifically the hawk, which represents power, vision, and freedom.”


Scene: From the collection of Kerry Phelan.


Scene: From the collection of Kerry Phelan.


Scene: At the show, Tracy Tajbl, Assistant Dean for Advancement; Lauren Cramer, a University Trustee and Chair of the College of Visual and Performing Arts Advisory Council; Dr. Michael Tick, Dean, College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University, and his wife Cathy Tick.


Scene: At the show, Jeffrey Mayers, Professor, Fashion Design and Stylist for the event; Iris Apfel, Fashion Icon; Emil de John, Guest Juror, Lecturer, and Collaborator with the Fashion Department; Todd Conover, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator Fashion Design.


Scene: From Felica Underwood’s collection. “Thrifted Luxury pays homage to home sewing, or task done out of necessity, sewing in fact opens a world of possibilities, and has historically made fashion accessible to the masses. With a sustainable stance, various textiles… These elements have been elevated by techniques such as hand embroidery while still maintaining the unique character of the material…


Scene: From the collection of Felica Underwood.


Scene: From Olivia Monopoli’s collection. “Amphitrite, Goddess of the Sea, lives deep within the oceans and is beautiful. With the growing pearls upon the ocean, she is sent to the surface of the water to protect her kingdom. Amphitrite is a collection based on where ocean meets land. The sparkling turquoise waters, golden sand beaches, textured waves, and turbulent ocean storms are all inspiration…


Scene: From the collection of Olivia Monopoli.


Scene: From the collection of Olivia Monopoli.


Scene: From Monica Zuckerman’s collection. “ISA is a state of serenity. With sky high mountains, cotton candy skies, mile long deserts, luscious vegetation, and blue and pink oceans. A harmony between what the future will be and what I dream for the future to be. ISA is a Utopia of what the future most likely will not become. Combining futuristic elements with fluidity and organic shapes


Scene: From the collection of Monica Zuckerman.


Scene: From the collection of Monica Zuckerman.


Scene: From Hailey Lee’s collection. “Origin is a Fall/Winter collection inspired by Hanbok, traditional Korean dress, with a twist of western influence. The collection shows the beauty of my home, South Korea, and modern alternative evening wear in western culture. The details consist of hand-dyed fabric, embroidery, fabric manipulation, and laser cutting technology…


Scene: From the collection of Hailey Lee.


Scene: From the collection of Hailey Lee.


Scene: From Tszching Cheng’s collection. “Brush Strokes. The strokes from traditional Chinese ink painting brush gives me the inspiration for my collection. When combined with natural colors, these strokes and prints create a cohesive overall impression. I utilized printed fabrics which have the feeling of a moving brush which moves quickly and slowly, lightly and heavily…


Scene: From the collection of Tszching Cheng.


Scene: From the collection of Tszching Cheng.


Scene: From Alexandra Wojnowski’s collection. “Lavable mixes delicacy and precision with organic uncontrollability to form a modern collection of versatile garments. In a world where invention and fortune can make anything possible, it is important to re-examine the basics. Obsidian, an archaic and naturally occurring stone is a juxtaposition to modern day technology advances. Syracuse University is home to the only furnace that can reheat obsidian into flowing lava. Paying homage to the simple things…”


Scene: From the collection of Alexandra Wojnowski.


Scene: From Victoria Kou’s collection. “Kimono is a traditional Japanese garment. When traveling in Kyoto, Japan, I was fascinated by Japanese culture and traditional garments. In my collection, I adopted key elements of the Kimono into my designs, specifically the one-piece garment, obi, and multiple layers. All of my looks are constructed by a one-piece combined garment…


Scene: From the collection of Victoria Kou.


Scene: From Naomi Galel’s collection. “On the Dance Floor of Modernity is inspired by the Impressionist, Edgar Degas, more specifically, his paintings of ballerinas. I looked towards his technique as well as the actual subjects in the paintings. After spending time analyzing… embracing the elegance and softness of the ballerinas…


Scene: From the collection of Naomi Galel.


Scene: From the collection of Naomi Galel.


Scene: From Amy Le’s collection. “Nostalgia is based on the concept of vintage photography capturing the layers of transparencies, muted colors, links and interconnections that serve as memories for us. Like a jigsaw puzzle, each photo is a moment of life. Conceptualized by fabric transparencies, muted-color fabrics, and design details such as waves and pleats…


Scene: From the collection of Amy Le.


Scene: From the collection of Amy Le.


Scene: From Hannah Feinstein’s collection. “Spindrift (noun). Spray blown from the crests of waves by the wind. A light sea breeze brings my collection ashore. Inspired by bright glistening pearls and organic green seaweed, my fabrics are natural hand-dyed fibers such as shimmery silks and crisp cottons… my collection captures the contrasting flows and structure of the ocean.


Scene: From the collection of Hannah Feinstein.


Scene: From the collection of Hannah Feinstein.


Scene: From Mikayla Schlossman’s collection. “The Nouve-Groove is an effortless and sensual Pre-Fall 2020 collection, heavily inspired by the feelings brought about by the 1970’s Disco Scene. This collection is electrifying with fluid garments juxtaposed with pieces that evoke sexual desire. The idea behind the Nouve-Groove originally began after watching the film Boogie Nights… and the euphoric feelings that were so evident at this time…” 


Scene: From the collection of Mikayla Schlossman.


Scene: From the collection of Mikayla Schlossman.


Scene: Post runway, from the collection of Mikayla Schlossman. Far left, Barbara Berman, Professional Dresser, owner of BB Backstage, and FIT instructor in conversation behind model, and Stephen Lockett, right.


Scene: Post runway, Kirsten Schoonmaker, Assistant Teaching Professor; Jeffrey Mayers, Professor, Fashion Design and Stylist for the event; Adriana Gorea, Assistant Professor; and Todd Conover, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator Fashion Design, behind the scene.


Scene: Annie Carson, Senior Fashion Designer, who won both the Iris Apfel award and the Moschino award. In this photo Annie is about to give the bouquet to Adriana Gorea, Assistant Professor, who is leaving.


Scene: Amy Le, Senior Fashion Designer, who won the Badgley Mischka award; Emil de John, Guest Juror, Lecturer, and Collaborator with the Fashion Department; and Iris Apfel, Fashion Icon.


Scene: Sierra Bennedetto Brouillet, Senior Fashion Designer, who won the Jeremy Scott award. Left is Emil de John, Guest Juror, Lecturer, and Collaborator with the Fashion Department, and to her right Iris Apfel, Fashion Icon.


Scene: At the show, Dr. Michael Tick, Dean, College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University, and his wife Cathy Tick.


Scene: At the show, Dr. James Fathers, Director of School of Design, and his wife Kath Fathers.


Scene: From the collection of Nicola Carlacci. “… Life is to short, why take things too seriously? I’m just here to blow kisses.